Throw Pillows From Etro

By on April 30, 2013
Throw Pillows From Etro 8

The entrepreneurial venture of Etro began in 1968, when Gimmo Etro, the brand’s founder, launched a range of fabrics using noble and natural fibers, which he embellished with original designs and innovative color ways. In 1981, the furnishings textiles line made its debut. The Paisley motif used to enrich the first collection was set to become the Etro mark of identity and a constant source of inspiration.

The Paisley pattern is an ancient decorative feature originally from Mesopotamia where it symbolized the shoot of the date palm which represented the tree of life.

We gathered some throw pillows from Etro’s home collection for spring-summer 2013. which one’s your favorite for the bedroom?

Throw Pillows From Etro 1 Throw Pillows From Etro 2 Throw Pillows From Etro 3 Throw Pillows From Etro 4 Throw Pillows From Etro 5 Throw Pillows From Etro 6 Throw Pillows From Etro 7 Throw Pillows From Etro 8 Throw Pillows From Etro 9

Etro Pillow 10 Etro Pillow 9 Etro Pillow 20 Etro Pillow 19 Etro Pillow 8 Etro Pillow 18 Etro Pillow 7 Etro Pillow 16 Etro Pillow 17 Etro Pillow 6 Etro Pillow 21 Etro Pillow 15 Etro Pillow 14 Etro Pillow 4 Etro Pillow 13 Etro Pillow 12 Etro Pillow 11 Etro Pillow 2 Etro Pillow 3 Etro Pillow 1

Have you ever wondered who were the first people to use pillows? More than 9,000 years ago, in Mesopotamia, people started to be civilized enough in order to desire more comfort than that of the floor or a piece of furniture. During this time, only the wealthy and more fortunate people of the world were the ones to use pillows. The number of pillows symbolized status, so, the more pillows one owned, the more affluence he or she held. Pillows were not always soft and comfy: in ancient China, for example, they used to make porcelain ones, while in Egypt they used to make out of wood or stone (but those were for the departed ones). The ancient Romans and Greeks mastered the creation of softer pillows, using reeds, feathers and straw.

Read more on: etro.com and wikipedia.org.

Photo source: etro.com

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